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The Right Vaccination Program For Dog

dog vaccinations
Depending on where you and your dog live, and on your dog's lifestyle, your canine vaccination program is going to entail getting him vaccinated every 1 to 3 years, and maybe more often. Which shots does your dog need? To help you decide, read the following chart and consult with your vet, checking the box in the right-hand column for the optional vaccines your dog should have. (We've checked the column for you, for must-have vaccinations.) Then mark your calendar and make sure proper shots are given.
dog vaccinations
dog vaccinations

Disease: Coronavirus.

Viral infection that can cause diarrhea in dogs, which can range from mild to fatal (the latter being uncommon). Death is most likely to occur in puppies under 6 months of age. Spread via contaminated fecal material.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, again at 10 - 12 weeks; annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular). Does your dog need it? Optional, consult your vet?

Disease: Distemper.

Viral infection that remains a killer of dogs worldwide. Related to the virus that causes measles in humans. Characterized initially by signs of upper respiratory disease, and later by more. severe respiratory disease, vomiting, diarrhea, and neurological signs. Transmitted both through the air, and via body secretions, such as urine.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, then again at 10 - 12 weeks and 14 - 16 weeks, annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular).
Does your dog need it? Yes.

Disease: Infectious canine hepatitis.

Viral infection of dogs and foxes characterized by signs involving the liver, kidneys, eyes ("blue eye"), and cells lining the inner surface of blood vessels. Spread via body fluids, including urine and nasal discharge.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, then again at 10 - 12 weeks and 14 - 16 weeks, annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular).
Does your dog need it? Yes.

Disease: Kennel cough (parainfluenza).

A highly contagious viral disease characterized by a honk-like dry cough. Causes inflammation of the trachea, larynx, and bronchi. Rarely fatal. Spread mainly via airborne particles.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, then again at 10 - 12 weeks and 14 - 16 weeks, annual thereafter. Vaccinated dogs should receive booster intranasal immunizations approximately 1 week before potential exposure (boarding, showing, ....etc.).

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular) or intranasal (spray in nose).
Does your dog need it? Optional, consult your vet.

Disease: Leptospirosis.

A bacterial disease characterized by kidney disease, liver disease, or hemorrhages. Spread in the urine of infected animals; rats appear to be main reservoirs of the bacteria. Can be transmitted to humans in the form of a condition called Weil's disease.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, then again at 10 - 12 weeks and 14 - 16 weeks, annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular).
Does your dog need it? If leptospirosis is endemic in your area, consult with your vet.

Disease: Lyme disease.

A tick-borne illness caused by the bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi. Characterized by sudden-onset lameness caused by tender, swollen joints that are painful to the touch (infectious arthritis). Regarded as the most common tick-borne disease in the U.S.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, again at 10 - 12 weeks, annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (intra-muscular).
Does your dog need it? If Lyme disease is endemic in your area, consult your vet.

Disease: Parvovirus.

A viral infection that's one of the most contagious and fatal diseases in the dog world. Characterized by vomiting and diarrhea. While it's generally thought of as a puppy disease, can affect–and kill–dogs of any age. Diarrhea is usually severe–projectile and bloody. The disease is transmitted via direct and indirect contact with contaminated dogs.

Frequency of vaccination:

For puppies, initial dose at age 6 - 8 weeks, then again at 10 - 12 weeks and 14 - 16 weeks. An optional fourth vaccination can be given at 18 to 20 weeks (consult your vet), annual thereafter.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular).
Does your dog need it? Yes.

Disease: Rabies.

Fatal viral disease spread by the bite or saliva of infected mammals; all other animals (including humans) that come into contact with an affected dog are at risk. Characterized by drooling, incoordination, aggression, confusion.

Frequency of vaccination:

Initial vaccine at 12 weeks; every 1 to 3 years thereafter, depending on the vaccine used and local/state ordinances.

Mode of administration:

Injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular).
Does your dog need it? Yes.

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